Tag Archives: EPA

This Cancer Survivor’s Story Shows What Gutting the EPA Would Mean for Public Health

Greenpeace

Donald Trump wants to slash the EPA’s budget and defund public health programs — which could cost people like Heather Von St. James their lives. This is her story.

Heather Von St. James has a friendly, Midwestern quality to her voice. Speaking to her over the phone, she comes off relaxed and assured, passionate yet polished.

But when you ask her about Donald Trump, something in her voice starts to change. There’s an exasperation, a sense of controlled but forceful frustration just under the surface of her jovial tone.

“It just makes me so angry,” was the first thing she said when I asked her what she thought of Trump’s decision to place Scott Pruitt at the head of the EPA.
That’s because Heather knows firsthand the devastation that could happen if Trump and Pruitt’s attempts to gut the EPA are successful.

At 36 years old, Heather was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare form of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. She’s one of about 7 to 9 percent of mesothelioma patients who has lived more than five years after diagnosis, and one of even fewer who have actually defeated the disease. Since recovering 11 years ago, Heather has poured her time into fighting for regulations that limit Americans’ exposure to asbestos and championing protections for environmental health.

And she was seeing important progress in regulating pollutants and carcinogens like asbestos through the EPA — until Trump entered office. …

keep reading and view video at Greenpeace

Top 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Polluting Scott Pruitt

Sierra Club, 1/6/17

The core, fundamental responsibility of the Environmental Protection Agency is to ensure clean air and clean water for all Americans in order to protect our health and keep us safe. So, the agency deserves a leader who will pursue that mission tirelessly and passionately. But President-elect Donald Trump has instead nominated Scott Pruitt, the Oklahoma Attorney General, who has made a career out of fighting EPA safeguards and putting the priorities of big polluters before the people of his state. In fact, he even went as far as making the absurd statement that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency “was never intended to be our nation’s foremost environmental regulator.”

Pruitt has proven time and time again that he can’t be trusted to protect our air and water, and that Trump chose him to follow through on a threat to get rid of the EPA “in almost every form” saying “We are going to have little tidbits.” Just how bad is Pruitt’s record? Well, it’s terrible. Here are the top five things you need to know about polluting Pruitt:…

keep reading at Sierra Club

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER PARIS?

from Chester County Citizens for Climate Protection newsletter Nov-Dec 2015

Renewable Energy World, a multimedia platform for renewable energy information, asserts that the U.S. will continue to make good progress on CO2 emission reductions well after the Paris talks. Here are their reasons why:

• The Clean Power Plan, finalized by the EPA in August, will cut emissions by existing power plants 32% by 2030, and has the potential for further reductions if state implementation plans incorporate energy efficiency and increased use of renewables.

• A second round of fuel efficiency standards are coming for medium and heavy-duty trucks by the EPA and the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration.

• Advance notice has been given of proposed rule-making to reduce carbon emissions from commercial airplane engines.

• DOE has finalized several new efficiency standards for appliances and other equipment and is on the verge of setting new standards for commercial rooftop air conditioners. New air conditioner rules are expected to provide the biggest energy savings of any DOE initiatives to date.

• The EPA has recently proposed rules targeting methane reduction in the oil and gas sectors. This could reduce emissions up to 10 million tons by 2025.

• New landfill emission standards for both existing and new landfills are expected to reduce GHG emissions by 12.2 million tons by 2025.

• EPA regulations are required by law to be science-based. Any new administration would need scientific justification to reverse the Clean Power Plan and other existing regulations.

• Finally, important bilateral climate commitments are evolving between the US and China, India, Mexico, Brazil and other countries. ~SOURCE