Election Results – 2022

Winners include:

US Senator: John Fetterman
Governor: Josh Shapiro
Lt Governor: Austin Davis
US Congress 6th District: Chrissy Houlahan
PA State Senate 44: Katie Muth
PA House 155: Daniel Friel Otten
PA House 26:  Paul Friel
PA House 167: Kristine Howard
PA House 156: Chris Pielli
PA House 158: Christina Sappey
PA House 157: Melissa Shusterman
PA House 74: Dan Williams

 Although still unofficial, the Democratic State Committee has declared they have won control of the state House and selected Rep. Joanna McClinton as next speaker.

Upcoming Elections 


May 16, 2023 is the next Primary Election

Is your vote secure? Yes! See the levels of security and double checking in this Voter Services video.

Register To Vote

You can also change your voting address, or change your party.

NOTE TO 17-YEAR OLDS

If you will turn 18 by general Election Day in November, you can register to vote before the primary and VOTE IN THE PRIMARY.

You can register or change your party or address of registration any time between the day after one primary or general election and 15 days before the next election.

When can you change your registration?

You can register or change your party or address of registration any time between the day after one primary or general election and 15 days before the next election.

Vote By Mail or Drop Box

Voting by mail-in or absentee ballot is safe, secure, and easy.

Drop Box Locations

There will be convenient drop-box locations throughout the county. See locations/times here.

You may drop your ballot off at Chester County Voter Services at 601 Westtown Rd, Suite 150, West Chester, PA 19380-0990.  The dropbox in the lobby is available  until 8pm on Election Day.

Applying to Vote By Mail or Absentee

You can apply online for your vote by mail  ballot or call 1-877-VOTESPA.

While you may apply to vote by mail as late as 5:00 pm on the Tuesday prior to the election, It is best to apply as early as possible!

All further vote by mail questions, go to the Pennsylvania Voting Website.

IMPORTANT:

  • You must apply for an absentee or mail-in ballot for each election (both primary and general), unless you have requested an annual ballot (an annual ballot request must be renewed each calendar year; you will receive a reminder by mail every February.
  • You can also download, print and complete a mail-in paper application, or you can pick up a blank application form in person (bring identification) at Voter Services, 601 Westtown Rd, Suite 150, West Chester, PA 19380.
  • If you apply online and enter a driver’s license or PennDot ID number, indicate your name as it appears on that state ID.
  • On the written application, your municipality is the political entity where you live (e.g., West Goshen), not your postal address (which, for West Goshen, would be West Chester). “Ward” applies to just a few municipalities, e.g., West Chester ward 3. “Voting district” refers to precinct number, which for that ward is 835. But those answers are not essential.

Note: If you have applied for your ballot online and included an e-mail address, you will receive notifications when your:
• application is processed
• ballot is sent
• voted ballot is received by Voter Services

Status of your Application

You may check the status of your ballot at the Department of State website.

The Results will be one of the following:

• No Record means you haven’t applied yet or that your ballot has yet to be processed. It may take up to 10-14 business days from the time you submit your application for processing.
• Pending means your application was received and approved, but that your ballot has not been mailed yet.
• Processed means your application was received and approved, and your ballot has been mailed.
• Vote Recorded means Voter Services has received your ballot and recorded your vote.

You may also call Chester County Voter Services at 610-344-6410.

Note: It may take a week or more once you apply for your status to be updated. 

Completing your ballot

When you are filling out the ballot, be sure to follow instructions precisely. Use one ballpoint pen with black ink.

Pennsylvania no longer has straight party voting. You must vote for every office individually. All races are important! Please vote your whole ballot. Do your homework online (one of the advantages of voting by mail: you can check the internet as you vote).

You have to return 3 items (see what they look like in this PA Dems video, source of image of completed back of outside envelope).

  1. The completed ballot inside…
  2. The inner “secrecy” envelope labeled OFFICIAL ELECTION BALLOT (do not write anything on it; seal it) inside…
  3. The outer envelope, must be signed and dated.

DO NOT TAPE or REOPEN your ballot. If you have made a mistake with your ballot, please contact voter services.

Sending your ballot

Voter Services must receive your filled-out ballot by Election Day. You can drop it in a drop box by 8:00 pm on Election Day.

Postmarks on Election Day will not be counted. Your ballot must reach voter services by Election Day. If you wish to send your ballot by mail, follow the completing your ballot instructions and place it in the mailbox. Or, pay extra to use a company like UPS or FedEx. Put your ballot inside its 2 envelopes and then place it inside the commercial envelope.

Did not receive Mail-In Ballot

If you have your mail ballot, but did not mail it or drop it off, you can still vote at the polls by taking your full packet (ballot and 2 envelopes) to your polling place on Election Day. You will ask for it to be voided and a regular ballot will be issued to you. If you don’t bring the needed parts, then you can still vote provisionally (this option is not ideal). Take identification just in case.

If you aren’t sure if you sent your ballot in time and did not drop it off, you can also go to your polling place on Election Day. If the County receives your mail-in ballot on time, that ballot will count. If not, ask to vote in person.

Absentee Voting

If you qualify as an absentee voter, you must vote by absentee ballot. You will need to indicate your reason, either

• I will be absent from my municipality
• I have an illness or physical disability

Otherwise, the process is the same as for mail-in voting.

Apply for absentee ballot now. 

There is also a provision for emergency absentee voting if a sudden emergency (like being hospitalized) after the absentee ballot application deadline prevents you from going to the polls as planned. Download the application form and the authorization form.

Vote at the Polls

On Election Day, polls are open from 7AM to 8PM.

WHEN IS ELECTION DAY?

November 8, 2022 is the General Election.

  • In a presidential election year, the primary is in April. In all other election years, the primary is in May.
  • The general election is always the Tuesday after the first Monday in November of that year.
  • Polls are open for in-person voting from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.
  • If there is a line at 8pm, and you are in the line at 8 p.m., you will be allowed to vote, no matter how long it takes.
HOW DO I VOTE?

See the video on how our voting machines work. Chester County led the way in Pennsylvania on using optical scan sheets, which means that in the case of a recount, all ballots can be physically inspected and the electronic count corrected as warranted.

Pennsylvania no longer has straight party voting. You must vote for every office individually. All races are important! Please vote your whole ballot. Do your homework online and talk with Dem greeters and pick up their handouts before going in to vote.

IDENTIFICATION

You need a valid form of identification (preferably, driver’s license or other photo ID. You may use photo student ID card, utility bill, bank statement, etc.) only if you haven’t voted as a resident of your current precinct before. It is not correct to say “if you have not voted before in PA” or “in your current polling place” (the physical location can change; it is the precinct that counts). Call 833-728-6837 if you believe a polling official is requesting identification erroneously.

Note: With a first-time voter absentee vote application, send a photocopy of one of those items. In both cases, photo ID works best.

EARLY IN-PERSON VOTING

If you are a registered Pennsylvania voter, you can use the early, in-person voting option. Between the time that ballots are ready and the last day to request a mail-in or absentee ballot a week before an election, you can request, receive, vote and cast your mail-in or absentee ballot all in one visit to your county election board or other designated location. With this option, there is no need for mail at all, and you can cast your vote at your convenience.

Learn more about early voting.

Note that this option may require spending extra time in the County Voter Services office and is not available after the last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot.

WHAT IS A PROVISIONAL BALLOT?

While this is not optimal, you may cast a provisional ballot, which may or not be counted if you are turned down for a regular ballot. This is why it’s important to be sure you know your correct polling place before you go to vote. Click here to find your polling location. Details provided by Chesco Voter Services, 11/15:

Provisional Ballot Regs:

25 P.S. §3050

A provisional ballot is used to record a vote when there is a question regarding a voter’s eligibility. The voter has the right to vote by provisional ballot if:

    • Their name does not appear in the poll book or supplemental list and is not able to be determined their registration status immediately.
    • The poll book indicates ID REQUIRED in the poll book signature block and the voter is unable to show proper ID (ID needed when first time voting in that precinct).
    • If the voter is challenged based on their registration and they are unable to complete the Challenge Affidavit.
    • The voter is accidentally in the wrong precinct and does not have enough time to vote at their correct precinct.
    • Only those contests that match the voter’s original precinct ballot will be counted.
    • If the voter “intentionally and willfully” went to the wrong precinct to try and cast a vote, it will not be counted. (this happens often when voters assume it is ok to try to vote in a different precinct because it is more convenient to them)
  • If the voter uses a Provisional Ballot but fails to sign it, or if their signature is determined to be fraudulent or not match their registration record, it will not count.

*In all cases the Judge of Elections should call Voter Services before issuing a Provision ballot. VS will research the situation and determine the voter’s registration status first.

Register To Vote

You can also change your voting address, or change your party.

Vote By Mail or Drop Box

Voting by mail-in or absentee ballot is safe, secure, and easy.

Vote at the Polls

On Election Day, polls are open from 7AM to 8PM.

NOTE TO 17-YEAR OLDS

If you will turn 18 by general Election Day in November, you can register to vote before the primary and VOTE IN THE PRIMARY.

You can register or change your party or address of registration any time between the day after one primary or general election and 15 days before the next election.

When can you change your registration?

You can register or change your party or address of registration any time between the day after one primary or general election and 15 days before the next election.

Drop Box Locations

There will be convenient drop-box locations throughout the county. See locations/times here.

You may drop your ballot off at Chester County Voter Services at 601 Westtown Rd, Suite 150, West Chester, PA 19380-0990.  The dropbox in the lobby is available  until 8pm on Election Day.

Applying to Vote By Mail or Absentee

You can apply online for your vote by mail  ballot or call 1-877-VOTESPA.

While you may apply to vote by mail as late as 5:00 pm on the Tuesday prior to the election, It is best to apply as early as possible!

All further vote by mail questions, go to the Pennsylvania Voting Website.

IMPORTANT:

  • You must apply for an absentee or mail-in ballot for each election (both primary and general), unless you have requested an annual ballot (an annual ballot request must be renewed each calendar year; you will receive a reminder by mail every February.
  • You can also download, print and complete a mail-in paper application, or you can pick up a blank application form in person (bring identification) at Voter Services, 601 Westtown Rd, Suite 150, West Chester, PA 19380.
  • If you apply online and enter a driver’s license or PennDot ID number, indicate your name as it appears on that state ID.
  • On the written application, your municipality is the political entity where you live (e.g., West Goshen), not your postal address (which, for West Goshen, would be West Chester). “Ward” applies to just a few municipalities, e.g., West Chester ward 3. “Voting district” refers to precinct number, which for that ward is 835. But those answers are not essential.

Note: If you have applied for your ballot online and included an e-mail address, you will receive notifications when your:
• application is processed
• ballot is sent
• voted ballot is received by Voter Services

Status of your Application

You may check the status of your ballot at the Department of State website.

The Results will be one of the following:

• No Record means you haven’t applied yet or that your ballot has yet to be processed. It may take up to 10-14 business days from the time you submit your application for processing.
• Pending means your application was received and approved, but that your ballot has not been mailed yet.
• Processed means your application was received and approved, and your ballot has been mailed.
• Vote Recorded means Voter Services has received your ballot and recorded your vote.

You may also call Chester County Voter Services at 610-344-6410.

Note: It may take a week or more once you apply for your status to be updated. 

Completing your ballot

When you are filling out the ballot, be sure to follow instructions precisely. Use one ballpoint pen with black ink.

Pennsylvania no longer has straight party voting. You must vote for every office individually. All races are important! Please vote your whole ballot. Do your homework online (one of the advantages of voting by mail: you can check the internet as you vote).

You have to return 3 items (see what they look like in this PA Dems video, source of image of completed back of outside envelope).

  1. The completed ballot inside…
  2. The inner “secrecy” envelope labeled OFFICIAL ELECTION BALLOT (do not write anything on it; seal it) inside…
  3. The outer envelope, must be signed and dated.

DO NOT TAPE or REOPEN your ballot. If you have made a mistake with your ballot, please contact voter services.

Sending your ballot

Voter Services must receive your filled-out ballot by Election Day. You can drop it in a drop box by 8:00 pm on Election Day.

Postmarks on Election Day will not be counted. Your ballot must reach voter services by Election Day. If you wish to send your ballot by mail, follow the completing your ballot instructions and place it in the mailbox. Or, pay extra to use a company like UPS or FedEx. Put your ballot inside its 2 envelopes and then place it inside the commercial envelope.

Did not receive Mail-In Ballot

If you have your mail ballot, but did not mail it or drop it off, you can still vote at the polls by taking your full packet (ballot and 2 envelopes) to your polling place on Election Day. You will ask for it to be voided and a regular ballot will be issued to you. If you don’t bring the needed parts, then you can still vote provisionally (this option is not ideal). Take identification just in case.

If you aren’t sure if you sent your ballot in time and did not drop it off, you can also go to your polling place on Election Day. If the County receives your mail-in ballot on time, that ballot will count. If not, ask to vote in person.

Absentee Voting

If you qualify as an absentee voter, you must vote by absentee ballot. You will need to indicate your reason, either

• I will be absent from my municipality
• I have an illness or physical disability

Otherwise, the process is the same as for mail-in voting.

Apply for absentee ballot now. 

There is also a provision for emergency absentee voting if a sudden emergency (like being hospitalized) after the absentee ballot application deadline prevents you from going to the polls as planned. Download the application form and the authorization form.

WHEN IS ELECTION DAY?

November 8, 2022 is the General Election.

  • In a presidential election year, the primary is in April. In all other election years, the primary is in May.
  • The general election is always the Tuesday after the first Monday in November of that year.
  • Polls are open for in-person voting from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.
  • If there is a line at 8pm, and you are in the line at 8 p.m., you will be allowed to vote, no matter how long it takes.
HOW DO I VOTE?

See the video on how our voting machines work. Chester County led the way in Pennsylvania on using optical scan sheets, which means that in the case of a recount, all ballots can be physically inspected and the electronic count corrected as warranted.

Pennsylvania no longer has straight party voting. You must vote for every office individually. All races are important! Please vote your whole ballot. Do your homework online and talk with Dem greeters and pick up their handouts before going in to vote.

IDENTIFICATION

You need a valid form of identification (preferably, driver’s license or other photo ID. You may use photo student ID card, utility bill, bank statement, etc.) only if you haven’t voted as a resident of your current precinct before. It is not correct to say “if you have not voted before in PA” or “in your current polling place” (the physical location can change; it is the precinct that counts). Call 833-728-6837 if you believe a polling official is requesting identification erroneously.

Note: With a first-time voter absentee vote application, send a photocopy of one of those items. In both cases, photo ID works best.

EARLY IN-PERSON VOTING

If you are a registered Pennsylvania voter, you can use the early, in-person voting option. Between the time that ballots are ready and the last day to request a mail-in or absentee ballot a week before an election, you can request, receive, vote and cast your mail-in or absentee ballot all in one visit to your county election board or other designated location. With this option, there is no need for mail at all, and you can cast your vote at your convenience.

Learn more about early voting.

Note that this option may require spending extra time in the County Voter Services office and is not available after the last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot.

WHAT IS A PROVISIONAL BALLOT?

While this is not optimal, you may cast a provisional ballot, which may or not be counted if you are turned down for a regular ballot. This is why it’s important to be sure you know your correct polling place before you go to vote. Click here to find your polling location. Details provided by Chesco Voter Services, 11/15:

Provisional Ballot Regs:

25 P.S. §3050

A provisional ballot is used to record a vote when there is a question regarding a voter’s eligibility. The voter has the right to vote by provisional ballot if:

    • Their name does not appear in the poll book or supplemental list and is not able to be determined their registration status immediately.
    • The poll book indicates ID REQUIRED in the poll book signature block and the voter is unable to show proper ID (ID needed when first time voting in that precinct).
    • If the voter is challenged based on their registration and they are unable to complete the Challenge Affidavit.
    • The voter is accidentally in the wrong precinct and does not have enough time to vote at their correct precinct.
    • Only those contests that match the voter’s original precinct ballot will be counted.
    • If the voter “intentionally and willfully” went to the wrong precinct to try and cast a vote, it will not be counted. (this happens often when voters assume it is ok to try to vote in a different precinct because it is more convenient to them)
  • If the voter uses a Provisional Ballot but fails to sign it, or if their signature is determined to be fraudulent or not match their registration record, it will not count.

*In all cases the Judge of Elections should call Voter Services before issuing a Provision ballot. VS will research the situation and determine the voter’s registration status first.

Meet the 2022 Candidates on your November 8 Mid-Term Election Ballot

John Fetterman

John Fetterman

US Senate

Current PA Lt. Governor, John Fetterman doesn’t look or talk like a typical politician, and he hasn’t followed the traditional path to running for office. As Lt. Governor, he advocates for economic justice and criminal justice reform. As the chair of Pennsylvania’s Board of Pardons, John has led the fight to give second chances to non-violent longtime inmates and free those who have been wrongfully convicted. He has...Read More

John Fetterman

John Fetterman

US Senate

Current PA Lt. Governor, John Fetterman doesn’t look or talk like a typical politician, and he hasn’t followed the traditional path to running for office. As Lt. Governor, he advocates for economic justice and criminal justice reform. As the chair of Pennsylvania’s Board of Pardons, John has led the fight to give second chances to non-violent longtime inmates and free those who have been wrongfully convicted. He has taken numerous steps to overhaul the clemency process in Pennsylvania. Under John’s tenure, the Board has recommended more applicants for commutation than under any lieutenant governor in decades. He supported legalizing marijuana before it was popular, officiated a same-sex marriage before it was legal, and pushed for single payer healthcare long before it was mainstream. The issues John is running on now are the same issues he’s been working on for the last two decades.

P.O Box 6061,Pittsburgh,PA,15211
Josh Shapiro

Josh Shapiro

PA Governor

Throughout his career as a public servant, Josh Shapiro has taken on the status quo, brought people together to solve tough problems, and delivered results for the people of Pennsylvania. Since 2017, he has served as the People’s Attorney General, working every day to stand up to powerful institutions and protect Pennsylvanians’ rights. Now, Josh is running to be Pennsylvania’s next Governor — to move our Commonwe...Read More

Josh Shapiro

Josh Shapiro

PA Governor

Throughout his career as a public servant, Josh Shapiro has taken on the status quo, brought people together to solve tough problems, and delivered results for the people of Pennsylvania. Since 2017, he has served as the People’s Attorney General, working every day to stand up to powerful institutions and protect Pennsylvanians’ rights. Now, Josh is running to be Pennsylvania’s next Governor — to move our Commonwealth forward and tackle our biggest challenges.

Austin Davis

Austin Davis

PA Lt. Governor

Elected to the PA House in 2018, Austin Davis became the first African American to serve as state representative for the 35th Legislative District in Allegheny County. Currently, Austin serves as chair of the Allegheny County House Democratic Delegation and vice chair of the House Democratic Policy Committee, as well as serving on the House Appropriations Committee, House Consumer Affairs Committee, House Insurance Commit...Read More

Austin Davis

Austin Davis

PA Lt. Governor

Elected to the PA House in 2018, Austin Davis became the first African American to serve as state representative for the 35th Legislative District in Allegheny County. Currently, Austin serves as chair of the Allegheny County House Democratic Delegation and vice chair of the House Democratic Policy Committee, as well as serving on the House Appropriations Committee, House Consumer Affairs Committee, House Insurance Committee, and House Transportation Committee. Austin is also a member of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, Climate Caucus, and PA SAFE Caucus.

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

US Congress, PA-06

Elected to the US House in 2018 as the first woman and first Democrat to represent PA-06, Chrissy Houlahan is an Air Force veteran, engineer, entrepreneur, and educator. She serves on Armed Services, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business Committees. She’s on the leadership team of the New Democrat Coalition and is the co-founder of three Congressional Caucuses: Women in STEM, For County, and The Servicewomen, and Women Ve...Read More

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

US Congress, PA-06

Elected to the US House in 2018 as the first woman and first Democrat to represent PA-06, Chrissy Houlahan is an Air Force veteran, engineer, entrepreneur, and educator. She serves on Armed Services, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business Committees. She’s on the leadership team of the New Democrat Coalition and is the co-founder of three Congressional Caucuses: Women in STEM, For County, and The Servicewomen, and Women Veterans Caucus.

PO Box 222,Devon,PA,19333
Katie Muth (Incumbent)

Katie Muth (Incumbent)

PA Senate District 44

First elected to office in 2018, Katie Muth is a passionate advocate for change. Senator Muth has stood up to corporate polluters and defended the constitutional right of all Pennsylvanians to clean water, air, and land. She works to ensure that the retirement funds of hardworking teachers, school employees and taxpayers are invested and spent wisely in the Pennsylvania School Employees Retirement System, where she serves...Read More

Katie Muth (Incumbent)

Katie Muth (Incumbent)

PA Senate District 44

First elected to office in 2018, Katie Muth is a passionate advocate for change. Senator Muth has stood up to corporate polluters and defended the constitutional right of all Pennsylvanians to clean water, air, and land. She works to ensure that the retirement funds of hardworking teachers, school employees and taxpayers are invested and spent wisely in the Pennsylvania School Employees Retirement System, where she serves as a trustee.

P.O. Box 254,Royersford,PA,19468
David Cunningham

David Cunningham

PA House District 13

David Wesley Cunningham has had a lifelong career caring for and empowering people and providing leadership that makes a difference in people’s lives and in society. David graduated from Southern Connecticut University with a Master of Science in Education. He is an internationally recognized Communication Expert and Motivational Speaker. David was born in Pennsylvania and loves this state—particularly Highland Townsh...Read More

David Cunningham

David Cunningham

PA House District 13

David Wesley Cunningham has had a lifelong career caring for and empowering people and providing leadership that makes a difference in people’s lives and in society. David graduated from Southern Connecticut University with a Master of Science in Education. He is an internationally recognized Communication Expert and Motivational Speaker. David was born in Pennsylvania and loves this state—particularly Highland Township, where he lives with his husband Bill and multiple dogs and horses. David is an active member of Friendship Methodist Church in Gum Tree, Pa. His son David Jr. and family live in Connecticut. David will fight tirelessly in Harrisburg and be the voice for the people of House District 13.

Paul Friel

Paul Friel

PA House District 26

Paul Friel is a local business owner, a husband, a father of four, President of the Owen J Roberts School Board, and a lifelong Pennsylvania resident. Paul is running for State Representative for the 26th district because he believes we deserve a representative who will focus on the issues that matter to our community. Paul owns and operates PACE Environmental, a Mid Atlantic environmental testing and engineering firm.

Paul Friel

Paul Friel

PA House District 26

Paul Friel is a local business owner, a husband, a father of four, President of the Owen J Roberts School Board, and a lifelong Pennsylvania resident. Paul is running for State Representative for the 26th district because he believes we deserve a representative who will focus on the issues that matter to our community. Paul owns and operates PACE Environmental, a Mid Atlantic environmental testing and engineering firm.

PO Box 42,Kimberton Rd,Kimberton,PA,19442
Dan Williams (Incumbent)

Dan Williams (Incumbent)

PA House District 74

Elected in 2018, Dan Williams serves on the Committees for Professional Licensure, Aging, Human Serves, Urban Affairs, Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness, and in the Legislative Black Caucus. As Senior Pastor of New Life in Christ Fellowship, he has expanded the church to the largest in Coatesville and led initiatives for flood survivors and fire victims. As a former UPS supervisor and Teamster union member, Dan ...Read More

Dan Williams (Incumbent)

Dan Williams (Incumbent)

PA House District 74

Elected in 2018, Dan Williams serves on the Committees for Professional Licensure, Aging, Human Serves, Urban Affairs, Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness, and in the Legislative Black Caucus. As Senior Pastor of New Life in Christ Fellowship, he has expanded the church to the largest in Coatesville and led initiatives for flood survivors and fire victims. As a former UPS supervisor and Teamster union member, Dan supports workers in earning a living wage, accessing healthcare, and affording on the job protections. He facilitated a Guns for Amnesty Program and believes in responsible ownership.

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

PA House District 155

Elected in 2018, Danielle Friel Otten is the voice of the people in government. Danielle stands for the health, welfare, and safety of citizens, and the environment. The values and the reasons she ran for the State House of Representatives is commitment to building community, and serving people first. In 2021, Danielle was elected to serve as the House Chair for the Pennsylvania Legislative Climate Caucus. In 2022, Daniel...Read More

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

PA House District 155

Elected in 2018, Danielle Friel Otten is the voice of the people in government. Danielle stands for the health, welfare, and safety of citizens, and the environment. The values and the reasons she ran for the State House of Representatives is commitment to building community, and serving people first. In 2021, Danielle was elected to serve as the House Chair for the Pennsylvania Legislative Climate Caucus. In 2022, Danielle was named the Pennsylvania State Lead for the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators. In the State House, Danielle serves on the Environmental Resources and Energy, Aging and Older Adult Services, and Human Services committees.

Chris Pielli

Chris Pielli

PA House District 156

From serving our country in the U.S. Army to our county as the first Democratic Recorder of Deeds, Chris Pielli built his career around public service. Pielli is a father, a husband, an attorney, a veteran, and a teacher. He was a Democratic State Committeeperson, and a Township Supervisor. As the Republican Party threatens our basic freedoms, Pielli chooses to fight—defending voting rights; protecting our air, water, a...Read More

Chris Pielli

Chris Pielli

PA House District 156

From serving our country in the U.S. Army to our county as the first Democratic Recorder of Deeds, Chris Pielli built his career around public service. Pielli is a father, a husband, an attorney, a veteran, and a teacher. He was a Democratic State Committeeperson, and a Township Supervisor. As the Republican Party threatens our basic freedoms, Pielli chooses to fight—defending voting rights; protecting our air, water, and the environment; fighting for healthcare and equal rights.

P.O. Box 2051,West Chester,PA,19380
Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

PA House District 157

Melissa Shusterman is an entrepreneur; she was elected as State Representative for Pennsylvania’s 157th District in 2018. In the legislature, Melissa serves on the Judiciary, Aging and Older Adult Services, Children and Youth, and Tourism Committees. She has authored legislation related to small business loans, gun violence reform, environmental sustainability, and animal protections. She is the founder and Co-Chair of ...Read More

Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

PA House District 157

Melissa Shusterman is an entrepreneur; she was elected as State Representative for Pennsylvania’s 157th District in 2018. In the legislature, Melissa serves on the Judiciary, Aging and Older Adult Services, Children and Youth, and Tourism Committees. She has authored legislation related to small business loans, gun violence reform, environmental sustainability, and animal protections. She is the founder and Co-Chair of the Animal Protection Caucus and the Autism and Intellectual Disabilities Caucus.

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

PA House District 158

Prior to her election as State Representative in 2018, Christina Sappey was in senior staff positions for three state legislators since 2006. She currently serves on the PA House Committees on Agriculture & Rural Affairs, Local Government, and Veterans Affairs & Emergency Preparedness. Christina is an appointed member of the bi-partisan, bi-cameral PA Local Government Commission, as well as a member of the Autism ...Read More

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

PA House District 158

Prior to her election as State Representative in 2018, Christina Sappey was in senior staff positions for three state legislators since 2006. She currently serves on the PA House Committees on Agriculture & Rural Affairs, Local Government, and Veterans Affairs & Emergency Preparedness. Christina is an appointed member of the bi-partisan, bi-cameral PA Local Government Commission, as well as a member of the Autism and Intellectual Disabilities Caucus, Blue-Green, Climate Caucus, Ladies of the House, Mental Health Caucus, PA SAFE Caucus, and Women’s Health Caucus.

PO BOX 683,Kennett Square,PA,19348
Cathy Spahr

Cathy Spahr

PA House District 160

Cathy Spahr is running for state representative in the PA House 160th district. She is currently the Senior Planner and Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Lead for Delaware County, giving Cathy the experience required to understand how the intersection of federal, state and local government impacts individuals and businesses in Pennsylvania.  Cathy is a graduate of Emerge PA, an in-dept...Read More

Cathy Spahr

Cathy Spahr

PA House District 160

Cathy Spahr is running for state representative in the PA House 160th district. She is currently the Senior Planner and Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Lead for Delaware County, giving Cathy the experience required to understand how the intersection of federal, state and local government impacts individuals and businesses in Pennsylvania.  Cathy is a graduate of Emerge PA, an in-depth training program that inspires Democratic women to run for office. Cathy has the vision for a brighter future, the determination to make it happen, and the grit to persevere in the face of challenges. She is a former Chair of the Upper Chichester Dems, and is currently a committee person in Bethel Township.

Top-of-mind issues for Cathy include open space and natural resource preservation, and the empowerment of local government to better address community impacting issues such as the Mariner East 2 pipeline. She is focused on supporting more responsible legislation in the areas of  women’s rights, climate unpredictability, common sense gun laws, and the fair treatment of immigrants.

1322 Naamans Creek Rd,Garnet Valley,PA,19060
Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

PA House District 167

Kristine, a graduate of University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers Law, has served as the director of a social services and legal aid clinic, represented children in foster care, and worked as a child abuse investigator. Kristine has become the Democratic Caucus go-to-expert for issues of child welfare. Kristine was first elected in 2018 and currently serves on Children & Youth, State Government, Agriculture and Rural Aff...Read More

Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

PA House District 167

Kristine, a graduate of University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers Law, has served as the director of a social services and legal aid clinic, represented children in foster care, and worked as a child abuse investigator. Kristine has become the Democratic Caucus go-to-expert for issues of child welfare. Kristine was first elected in 2018 and currently serves on Children & Youth, State Government, Agriculture and Rural Affairs and Veterans' Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committees.

P.O. Box 252,Malvern,PA,19355
John Fetterman

John Fetterman

US Senate

Current PA Lt. Governor, John Fetterman doesn’t look or talk like a typical politician, and he hasn’t followed the traditional path to running for office. As Lt. Governor, he advocates for economic justice and criminal justice reform. As the chair of Pennsylvania’s Board of Pardons, John has led the fight to give second chances to non-violent longtime inmates and free those who have been wrongfully convicted. He has taken numerous steps to overhaul the clemency process in Pennsylvania. Under John’s tenure, the Board has recommended more applicants for commutation than under any lieutenant governor in decades. He supported legalizing marijuana before it was popular, officiated a same-sex marriage before it was legal, and pushed for single payer healthcare long before it was mainstream. The issues John is running on now are the same issues he’s been working on for the last two decades.

Josh Shapiro

Josh Shapiro

PA Governor

Throughout his career as a public servant, Josh Shapiro has taken on the status quo, brought people together to solve tough problems, and delivered results for the people of Pennsylvania. Since 2017, he has served as the People’s Attorney General, working every day to stand up to powerful institutions and protect Pennsylvanians’ rights. Now, Josh is running to be Pennsylvania’s next Governor — to move our Commonwealth forward and tackle our biggest challenges.

Austin Davis

Austin Davis

PA Lt. Governor

Elected to the PA House in 2018, Austin Davis became the first African American to serve as state representative for the 35th Legislative District in Allegheny County. Currently, Austin serves as chair of the Allegheny County House Democratic Delegation and vice chair of the House Democratic Policy Committee, as well as serving on the House Appropriations Committee, House Consumer Affairs Committee, House Insurance Committee, and House Transportation Committee. Austin is also a member of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, Climate Caucus, and PA SAFE Caucus.

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

Chrissy Houlahan (Incumbent)

US Congress, PA-06

Elected to the US House in 2018 as the first woman and first Democrat to represent PA-06, Chrissy Houlahan is an Air Force veteran, engineer, entrepreneur, and educator. She serves on Armed Services, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business Committees. She’s on the leadership team of the New Democrat Coalition and is the co-founder of three Congressional Caucuses: Women in STEM, For County, and The Servicewomen, and Women Veterans Caucus.

Katie Muth (Incumbent)

Katie Muth (Incumbent)

PA Senate District 44

First elected to office in 2018, Katie Muth is a passionate advocate for change. Senator Muth has stood up to corporate polluters and defended the constitutional right of all Pennsylvanians to clean water, air, and land. She works to ensure that the retirement funds of hardworking teachers, school employees and taxpayers are invested and spent wisely in the Pennsylvania School Employees Retirement System, where she serves as a trustee.

David Cunningham

David Cunningham

PA House District 13

David Wesley Cunningham has had a lifelong career caring for and empowering people and providing leadership that makes a difference in people’s lives and in society. David graduated from Southern Connecticut University with a Master of Science in Education. He is an internationally recognized Communication Expert and Motivational Speaker. David was born in Pennsylvania and loves this state—particularly Highland Township, where he lives with his husband Bill and multiple dogs and horses. David is an active member of Friendship Methodist Church in Gum Tree, Pa. His son David Jr. and family live in Connecticut. David will fight tirelessly in Harrisburg and be the voice for the people of House District 13.

Paul Friel

Paul Friel

PA House District 26

Paul Friel is a local business owner, a husband, a father of four, President of the Owen J Roberts School Board, and a lifelong Pennsylvania resident. Paul is running for State Representative for the 26th district because he believes we deserve a representative who will focus on the issues that matter to our community. Paul owns and operates PACE Environmental, a Mid Atlantic environmental testing and engineering firm.

Dan Williams (Incumbent)

PA House District 74

484-378-1848
Dan Williams (Incumbent)

Dan Williams (Incumbent)

PA House District 74

Elected in 2018, Dan Williams serves on the Committees for Professional Licensure, Aging, Human Serves, Urban Affairs, Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness, and in the Legislative Black Caucus. As Senior Pastor of New Life in Christ Fellowship, he has expanded the church to the largest in Coatesville and led initiatives for flood survivors and fire victims. As a former UPS supervisor and Teamster union member, Dan supports workers in earning a living wage, accessing healthcare, and affording on the job protections. He facilitated a Guns for Amnesty Program and believes in responsible ownership.

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

Danielle Otten (Incumbent)

PA House District 155

Elected in 2018, Danielle Friel Otten is the voice of the people in government. Danielle stands for the health, welfare, and safety of citizens, and the environment. The values and the reasons she ran for the State House of Representatives is commitment to building community, and serving people first. In 2021, Danielle was elected to serve as the House Chair for the Pennsylvania Legislative Climate Caucus. In 2022, Danielle was named the Pennsylvania State Lead for the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators. In the State House, Danielle serves on the Environmental Resources and Energy, Aging and Older Adult Services, and Human Services committees.

Chris Pielli

PA House District 156

Chris Pielli

Chris Pielli

PA House District 156

From serving our country in the U.S. Army to our county as the first Democratic Recorder of Deeds, Chris Pielli built his career around public service. Pielli is a father, a husband, an attorney, a veteran, and a teacher. He was a Democratic State Committeeperson, and a Township Supervisor. As the Republican Party threatens our basic freedoms, Pielli chooses to fight—defending voting rights; protecting our air, water, and the environment; fighting for healthcare and equal rights.

Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

Melissa Shusterman (Incumbent)

PA House District 157

Melissa Shusterman is an entrepreneur; she was elected as State Representative for Pennsylvania’s 157th District in 2018. In the legislature, Melissa serves on the Judiciary, Aging and Older Adult Services, Children and Youth, and Tourism Committees. She has authored legislation related to small business loans, gun violence reform, environmental sustainability, and animal protections. She is the founder and Co-Chair of the Animal Protection Caucus and the Autism and Intellectual Disabilities Caucus.

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

Christina Sappey (Incumbent)

PA House District 158

Prior to her election as State Representative in 2018, Christina Sappey was in senior staff positions for three state legislators since 2006. She currently serves on the PA House Committees on Agriculture & Rural Affairs, Local Government, and Veterans Affairs & Emergency Preparedness. Christina is an appointed member of the bi-partisan, bi-cameral PA Local Government Commission, as well as a member of the Autism and Intellectual Disabilities Caucus, Blue-Green, Climate Caucus, Ladies of the House, Mental Health Caucus, PA SAFE Caucus, and Women’s Health Caucus.

Cathy Spahr

Cathy Spahr

PA House District 160

Cathy Spahr is running for state representative in the PA House 160th district. She is currently the Senior Planner and Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Lead for Delaware County, giving Cathy the experience required to understand how the intersection of federal, state and local government impacts individuals and businesses in Pennsylvania.  Cathy is a graduate of Emerge PA, an in-depth training program that inspires Democratic women to run for office. Cathy has the vision for a brighter future, the determination to make it happen, and the grit to persevere in the face of challenges. She is a former Chair of the Upper Chichester Dems, and is currently a committee person in Bethel Township.

Top-of-mind issues for Cathy include open space and natural resource preservation, and the empowerment of local government to better address community impacting issues such as the Mariner East 2 pipeline. She is focused on supporting more responsible legislation in the areas of  women’s rights, climate unpredictability, common sense gun laws, and the fair treatment of immigrants.

Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

Kristine Howard (Incumbent)

PA House District 167

Kristine, a graduate of University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers Law, has served as the director of a social services and legal aid clinic, represented children in foster care, and worked as a child abuse investigator. Kristine has become the Democratic Caucus go-to-expert for issues of child welfare. Kristine was first elected in 2018 and currently serves on Children & Youth, State Government, Agriculture and Rural Affairs and Veterans' Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committees.

Why Vote?

Always vote!

Always Vote Because:

  • You want a fair minimum wage and equal pay for equal work.
  • You want students to have affordable loans.
  • You want the US to catch up to other countries in health care access.
  • You want a fair tax code in which the wealthy pay their fair share and the super-wealthy don’t profit from tax havens abroad.
  • You want the satisfaction of saying what you want every 6 months.
Vote in the Odd Years Too

Don’t skip voting in odd-year elections because you don’t think they are important. On the contrary, they shape your daily life. The individuals elected to every single municipal office have an impact on your family’s well-being and the policies that govern your township, school board, and county. For example:

  • Tax assessments (which may exceed your federal taxes)
  • Attention to climate change & sustainability in strategic planning
  • Condition of our streets and sewers; lack of sidewalks and bicycle trails
  • Capacity to attract new businesses and new residents
  • Criminal justice from streets to courts to prisons to fresh starts
  • Schools’ physical, social, and health environment
  • Integrity of election procedures

Adapted from the Easttown Dems

WHY VOTE DOWN BALLOT?

What does down ballot even mean? Paying attention to all candidates and casting your vote for EACH & EVERY RACE is called “Voting Down the Ballot.”  Democratic executive branch leaders (Governor and President) are severely hampered without a supportive legislative branch (US Congress and PA General Assembly).

  • A Democratic president needs Democrat US Senators from PA and Democratic US House of Representatives from PA to get progressive legislation passed.
  • A Democratic governor needs Democratic State Senators and Democratic State House Representatives to get progressive legislation passed and to protect his vetoes of objectionable legislation.
  • Likewise, with a Republican President or Governor, we need Democrats is both the US Senate and US House and PA State Senate and PA State House to halt the destruction of the what we hold dear.

So getting to the polls or voting by mail for each election is just the first step!

Unlike a river running downstream—where the runoff from the top tends to flood the banks below, Down Ballot Candidates for US Senate, US House of Representatives, PA State Senate and PA House of Representatives DO NOT automatically gain from voters for President or Governor.  We encourage you to vote the straight party ticket in the general elections, and we also encourage you to learn about all candidates.  Every Democrat needs to learn about and VOTE IN EVERY RACE ON THE BALLOT.

Much is at stake when you do not vote down ballot. Local and county governments are the closest to impacting your life and the lives of the people who you love. PA State Representatives and PA State Senators vote on bills concerning:

  • education
  • energy/renewables
  • environment
  • budget
  • taxes
  • individual and municipal rights
  • other issues that directly impact you and your family’s everyday lives.

Please Note: In odd-numbered years, candidates for School Director, Court of Common Pleas, and Magisterial District Judge can be cross-listed; therefore, not all candidates appearing as Democrats on the November ballot are actually Democrats. Contact your zone to find out who are actually Democrats and hold Democratic values.

CAN VOTERS WHO HAVE BEEN IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW VOTE?

Unlike many states, Pennsylvania permits voting by most individuals who have a legal record. Basically, all can register and vote except those who are currently serving a sentence for a felony (the highest class of offense, more serious than misdemeanors) and who will not be released before the next election.

Or, phrased positively, the following may register and vote if they have been citizens of the United States for at least one month before the next election; have been residents of Pennsylvania and their respective election districts for at least 30 days before the next election; and will be at least 18 years of age on the day of the next election:

  • Pretrial detainees (individuals who are confined in a penal institution awaiting trial on charges of a felony or a misdemeanor).
    Convicted misdemeanants (individuals who are confined in a penal institution for conviction of a misdemeanor only).
  • Individuals who have been released (or will be released by the date of the next election) from a correctional facility or halfway house upon completion of their term of incarceration for conviction of a misdemeanor or a felony.
  • Individuals who are on probation or released on parole, including parolees who are living in a halfway house.
  • Individuals who are under house arrest (home confinement), regardless of their conviction status or the status of their conditions of confinement.

Learn More about Voting Rights for Convicted Felons, Convicted Misdemeanants, and Pretrial Detainees.

Voting is the essential act of democracy! There are those who are trying to make it harder to vote, or who question the outcome of fair elections. You can stand up to them by just that simple act of voting, whether in person or by mail.

Has anyone said to you: “But I voted for president the last time around”? Tell them: “Our democratic system has 2 elections a year, every year: a primary election in the spring and a general election in the fall. You don’t vote once every 4 years, you vote 8 times in 4 years! Anyone who votes only in the presidential general election is losing out on 87.5% of the opportunity to be heard at the polls.”

Pennsylvania has almost a million more Democrats than Republicans. But Democrats have fewer seats in the US Congress and PA General Assembly as Republicans. Why? A major factor is voter turnout.

Every election matters, whether you are voting for a president who will lead the nation, a school board member who will help set local education policy and budgets, or a senator who will help determine the next appointee to the US Supreme Court.

Why Vote?

Voting is the essential act of democracy! There are those who are trying to make it harder to vote, or who question the outcome of fair elections. You can stand up to them by just that simple act of voting, whether in person or by mail.

Has anyone said to you: “But I voted for president the last time around”? Tell them: “Our democratic system has 2 elections a year, every year: a primary election in the spring and a general election in the fall. You don’t vote once every 4 years, you vote 8 times in 4 years! Anyone who votes only in the presidential general election is losing out on 87.5% of the opportunity to be heard at the polls.”

Pennsylvania has almost a million more Democrats than Republicans. But Democrats have fewer seats in the US Congress and PA General Assembly as Republicans. Why? A major factor is voter turnout.

Every election matters, whether you are voting for a president who will lead the nation, a school board member who will help set local education policy and budgets, or a senator who will help determine the next appointee to the US Supreme Court.

Always vote!

Always Vote Because:

  • You want a fair minimum wage and equal pay for equal work.
  • You want students to have affordable loans.
  • You want the US to catch up to other countries in health care access.
  • You want a fair tax code in which the wealthy pay their fair share and the super-wealthy don’t profit from tax havens abroad.
  • You want the satisfaction of saying what you want every 6 months.
Vote in the Odd Years Too

Don’t skip voting in odd-year elections because because you don’t think they are important. On the contrary, they shape your daily life. The individuals elected to every single municipal office have an impact on your family’s well-being and the policies that govern your township, school board, and county. For example:

  • Tax assessments (which may exceed your federal taxes)
  • Attention to climate change & sustainability in strategic planning
  • Condition of our streets and sewers; lack of sidewalks and bicycle trails
  • Capacity to attract new businesses and new residents
  • Criminal justice from streets to courts to prisons to fresh starts
  • Schools’ physical, social, and health environment
  • Integrity of election procedures

Adapted from the Easttown Dems

WHY VOTE DOWN BALLOT?

What does down ballot even mean? Paying attention to all candidates and casting your vote for EACH & EVERY RACE is called “Voting Down the Ballot.”  Democratic executive branch leaders (Governor and President) are severely hampered without a supportive legislative branch (US Congress and PA General Assembly).

  • A Democratic president needs Democrat US Senators from PA and Democratic US House of Representatives from PA to get progressive legislation passed.
  • A Democratic governor needs Democratic State Senators and Democratic State House Representatives to get progressive legislation passed and to protect his vetoes of objectionable legislation.
  • Likewise, with a Republican President or Governor, we need Democrats is both the US Senate and US House and PA State Senate and PA State House to halt the destruction of the what we hold dear.

So getting to the polls or voting by mail for each election is just the first step!

Unlike a river running downstream—where the runoff from the top tends to flood the banks below, Down Ballot Candidates for US Senate, US House of Representatives, PA State Senate and PA House of Representatives DO NOT automatically gain from voters for President or Governor.  We encourage you to vote the straight party ticket in the general elections, and we also encourage you to learn about all candidates.  Every Democrat needs to learn about and VOTE IN EVERY RACE ON THE BALLOT.

Much is at stake when you do not vote down ballot. Local and county governments are the closest to impacting your life and the lives of the people who you love. PA State Representatives and PA State Senators vote on bills concerning:

  • education
  • energy/renewables
  • environment
  • budget
  • taxes
  • individual and municipal rights
  • other issues that directly impact you and your family’s everyday lives.

Please Note: In odd-numbered years, candidates for School Director, Court of Common Pleas, and Magisterial District Judge can be cross-listed; therefore, not all candidates appearing as Democrats on the November ballot are actually Democrats. Contact your zone to find out who are actually Democrats and hold Democratic values.

CAN VOTERS WHO HAVE BEEN IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW VOTE?

Unlike many states, Pennsylvania permits voting by most individuals who have a legal record. Basically, all can register and vote except those who are currently serving a sentence for a felony (the highest class of offense, more serious than misdemeanors) and who will not be released before the next election.

Or, phrased positively, the following may register and vote if they have been citizens of the United States for at least one month before the next election; have been residents of Pennsylvania and their respective election districts for at least 30 days before the next election; and will be at least 18 years of age on the day of the next election:

  • Pretrial detainees (individuals who are confined in a penal institution awaiting trial on charges of a felony or a misdemeanor).
    Convicted misdemeanants (individuals who are confined in a penal institution for conviction of a misdemeanor only).
  • Individuals who have been released (or will be released by the date of the next election) from a correctional facility or halfway house upon completion of their term of incarceration for conviction of a misdemeanor or a felony.
  • Individuals who are on probation or released on parole, including parolees who are living in a halfway house.
  • Individuals who are under house arrest (home confinement), regardless of their conviction status or the status of their conditions of confinement.

Learn More about Voting Rights for Convicted Felons, Convicted Misdemeanants, and Pretrial Detainees.

Office Hours:
Mon – Thur 10AM-3PM

37 South High St.
    West Chester, PA 19382


(610) 692-5811

email CCDC